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If you want to sign all letters now, use the forms below. Click on “Read the Petition” if you would like to edit the letter before you send it. To learn more about the background of each letter, use the “Sign a Letter” navigation menu above. If you want to write your own letter, instructions are here.

 

Add your Signature to the Letter on Flame Retardants

Dear Ministers,

[signature]

79 signatures

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Sign the letter against plastic tags in our food web

This petition is now closed.

End date: Dec 01, 2016

Signatures collected: 64

64 signatures

Add your Signature to the Letter on Endocrine Disruptors

Dear Federal Scientists and Ministers,

[signature]

171 signatures

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Add your Signature to the Letter on Resource Extraction and Biodiversity

Dear Scientists,

[signature]

455 signatures

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Add your Signature to the Letter on Uranium Mining

Dear Dr. Jing Chen and Ministers,

[signature]

261 signatures

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Add your Signature to the Letter on Contaminants in the Far North

Dear Dear Ministers and Head of CHARS,

[signature]

593 signatures

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Add your Signature to the letter on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

Dear Ministers and Members of Parliament,

[signature]

741 signatures

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Add your Signature to the Letter on DFO Library closures

Dear Ministers,

[signature]

565 signatures

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Add Your Signature to the Letter on Marine Plastics in Food Webs

Dear Scientists and Ministers,

[signature]

516 signatures

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Add your Signature to the Letter on Effects of the Oil Sands on Water Quality

Dear Scientists,

[signature]

606 signatures

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Add your Signature to the Letter on Forest Management and Climate Change

Dear Scientists,

[signature]

506 signatures

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Add your Signature to the Letter on Cuts to Aboriginal Health

Dear Dr. Nicolas Gilbert,

[signature]

452 signatures

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Add your Signature to the Letter on Abandoned Mines

Dear Canadian Mines Ministers and Ms. Blancher-Smith (Chair, NOAMI),

[signature]

16 signatures

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Add your Signature to the Letter on Lead Toxicity

Dear Federal Scientists and Ministers,

cc
Dr. Jiping Zhu, Research Scientist, Health Canada
Dr. Suzanne Beauchemin, Research Scientist, Natural Resources Canada
Hon. Jane Philpott, Minister of Health
Hon. Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development
Hon. Kristy Duncan, Minister of Science
Hon. Jim Carr, Minister of Natural Resource

Thank you for your research as scientists with Health Canada. We are especially interested in your studies investigating lead, mercury, and cadmium contamination in household dust in Canadian homes, which found “significantly higher concentrations” inside homes than in the soil outdoors. While Canadians can be reassured that blood lead levels have declined significantly from the 1980s with the phasing out of leaded gas, there is still a great deal of ambiguity in regards to what is considered a safe level of lead exposure.

We are particularly interested in how your research engages with the World Health Organization’s conclusion that there are no safe levels of lead (WHO 2010: 11-12). A 2013 report issued by Health Canada confirmed that a series of studies “clearly document adverse health effects – including neurodevelopmental, neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, renal and reproductive effects – at blood lead levels below 10 micrograms per decilitre (µg/dL), the current Canadian blood intervention level” (Health Canada, 2013b: 4). The report goes on to state that there “is sufficient evidence that blood lead levels below 5 µg/dL are associated with adverse health effects,” and that “adverse health effects have also been associated with blood lead levels as low as 1-2 µg/dL” (4). By funding and issuing this 2013 health report, Canada was poised to be the first country to recognize the full significance of this new evidence by formulating new standards, policies, and practices to further prevent children from being exposed to lead. Unfortunately, such efforts were stalled and now Health Canada is in this contradictory position of having an outdated policy that does not coincide with current scientific evidence or with the health policies of other countries.

Based on this new evidence, the Centers of Disease Control (CDC) in the United States cut their accepted blood lead level in half, moving from an intervention level of 10 µg/dL to 5 µg/dL (www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/). But Health Canada, despite this evidence and the actions on the part of other countries to lower their levels of acceptability, has failed to issue lower thresholds.

Based on your expertise, we would like to know:

What does your research indicate about threshold doses at which lead becomes harmful to children? Does your research support a particular dose, or even the concept of acceptable doses? Are children at risk of harm if their blood lead level is below the current intervention level of 10 μg/dL? In your opinion, does Health Canada’s current policy put Canadians at risk?

I am writing this email as part of Write2Know (http://write2know.ca), a letter-writing campaign that aims to mobilize public awareness and inquiry into federal research programs. We want to let you know that we value federal science and scientists, and that our questions arise out of genuine concerns about the health and well-being of Canadians.

We remain concerned about the legacy of constraints on access to federal scientists and the results of their research, the elimination of essential research programs, and the closure of libraries and archives. These constraints and closures have impacted what Canadians can and cannot know about the health of their bodies, communities, and environments. We are hopeful that a new government will address our concerns.

We are posing questions to federal scientists about their research and findings, and forwarding our letters to federal Ministers and Members of Parliament to call attention to serious gaps between scientific evidence and government policy.

We look forward to your response.

Sincerely,

[signature]

176 signatures

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